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TASKE Technology's Call Center Blog

TASKE has released a Subscription License option in addition to the traditional Perpetual License.

What is a perpetual license?

Traditionally, TASKE software is purchased using a perpetual license. This software license is paid for upfront and licensed based on the number of agents you needed to monitor and TASKE features you want to use. The software is installed on a physical machine or a virtual machine in your private cloud. Technical support and software upgrades are available by purchasing a Total Care support plan for an annual fee.

What is a subscription license?

A subscription license is a monthly fee you pay to use the software. In TASKE’s hosted subscription model, we provide an Amazon Web Services EC2 server instance that hosts our software. We then charge monthly per minute used, which is calculated as Total Time calls are in Queue + Total Agent Talk Time. As long as you pay the monthly usage fees, and that usage is greater than 0, you are entitled to use all features of the software. The subscription fees include access to our Technical Support team and new versions of the software as they are released.

How do I decide?

Both license models have advantages and disadvantages and depend on your unique needs and available resources. There is no right or wrong answer, only what is right for your business. There is no difference in functionality between a subscription or a perpetual license or the type of support you will receive from our team.

If you still have questions, please contact our sales team to discuss the options.

Tags: license, perpetual, subscription

Last month, we talked about how KPIs can help you measure whether your contact center is meeting business objectives. We also covered a few KPIs that are generally accepted as core measures of service levels in a contact center: first call resolution, telephone service factor, and abandon rates.

Now, we’ll look more closely at KPIs for more specific contact center service models. In general, contact centers provide inbound or outbound call services. (Some contact centers may provide both types of service models, but for our purposes, let’s look at them independently.) In the case of inbound call services, callers initiate contact. Customer service and product support are common examples of contact centers for inbound call services.  For outbound call services, agents initiate contact, such as for product sales or charitable donations.

Although KPIs are all based on specific business objectives, KPIs for these models should be different. Inbound call services are generally measured on customer satisfaction while outbound call services are measured on revenue generated. Read more of Choose the Right KPIs for Your Contact Center Service Model

Tags: inbound contact center, KPI, metrics, outbound contact center, statistics

A lack of data is not likely a problem for your business. In fact, your contact center may have volumes of data about how many calls it gets in a day, how long callers waited to be answered, how many callers gave up waiting before they were answered, and so on. While these statistics are certainly valuable to you on a individual basis, you may want to consider leveraging further. Many businesses have found value in using statistics as metrics for key performance indicators. In other words, you can measure activity in the contact center to determine whether it is meeting higher-level business goals.

Let’s look at an example. A business in a very competitive market wants to keep as many customers as possible while giving new customers a positive experience.  One of the objectives for this business, then, is to maintain a relatively high customer satisfaction rate.  While this business objective affects all of its organizations, customer-facing units such as sales and support need to be particularly aware of changing conditions that could decrease customer satisfaction. Responding quickly and appropriately to these changes can mitigate any short-term concerns before they become long-term headaches. Read more of Measure for Success

Tags: abandon rates, first call resolution, KPI, metrics, statistics, TSF

Too frequently, yet another story about poor call handling seems to be going viral on the Internet. Whether the story is humorous or an exposé of bad customer service, you certainly don’t want to see one of your agents in a starring role on YouTube.

In the article “Forget the Millennials, The Connected Consumer is Who You Should Be Chasing“, Shama Hyder talks about how the social web has empowered consumers to not only drive their own buying experiences but powerfully influence their peers. Hyder notes that simple and fast is no longer sufficient, they now demand personalized and proactive contact. While it has become important to develop strategies for managing what customers are saying about you on the Internet, ideally, you don’t want to give customers a reason to share their negative comments in the first place.

When assessing customer interactions with your contact center, the place to start is always with your agents. You hope that your company’s hiring practices have employed talented individuals who are committed to providing the best possible service. But on a day-to-day basis, how do you know what any agent is doing at any given time? Read more of Monitoring Agent Activity

Tags: agent, agent activity, agent productivity, call metrics, metrics, monitor, Real-Time

Today, we expect information on demand and at our fingertips. In the context of our increasingly mobile workforce, it’s particularly important that the information we rely on to make decisions is accurate, and available both where and when we need it. Read more of Enabling Your Modern Workforce

Tags: agent activity, agent productivity, business objectives, communication channels, customer satisfaction, KPI, metrics, mobile, monitor, real-time monitoring, reports, trends